DECEMBER 2018 - Neighbours of Forest Hill 

Toronto

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2018 - TORONTO STOREYS

Toronto

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Sometimes it takes a shift in perspective to see the beauty that surrounds us.

Growing up in Toronto, photographer Lindsi Beth Hollend didn’t consider herself to be creative. Certainly, she appreciated art and culture, but years of depression and self-limiting beliefs kept her from expressing herself through art.

In 2014, Hollend began a healing journey, addressing her mental health challenges through self-help and medication. And when she took her first photograph that year, she suddenly saw things quite differently.

“I always felt I had a purpose that was just beyond my grasp,” recalls Hollend. “And when I picked up the camera, it was like I had a new limb, or a new sense. It was a gift that allowed me to better see the world not just visually, but emotionally.”

It’s the same world that we inhabit, but Hollend’s keen eye makes the familiar seem extraordinary. Her innate understanding of texture, layer and colour highlight Toronto’s natural beauty. And her vibrant, close-up captures of Toronto’s architecture are a master class in symmetry, pattern, and light reflection.

“Architecture just makes sense to me,” explains Hollend. “And it certainly evokes something in me. I guess it’s my muse.”

Her muse has been kind to her, as Hollend’s photographs of Toronto buildings have brought her much joy and garnered a lot of attention as of late.

Her favourite building to photograph is the iconic RBC building on Bay Street. According to Hollend, the building looks good in all lights, and its symmetry allows it to be photographed from every angle. (RBC’s windows being coated with 24-carat gold leaf can’t help but inspire, as well).

“Some of these buildings are truly magical,” notes Hollend. “But I don’t interact with them other than to snap them. So the photographs are my personal connection to the building and to the city.”

That personal connection is integral for Hollend, as both her artistic journey and her journey to wellness are fuelled by the connection of the inside and outside world.

And like the artist herself, Hollend’s architecture photographs are not constricted by frames or borders, nor defined solely by what’s going on inside.

“I love where I am right now…both emotionally and here, in Toronto,” says Hollend. “These buildings mirror us and the city so beautifully, and I aim to capture that in my work.”

July 9th, 2017

2017 - BAYCREST BRAIN PROJECT

Toronto

The Brain Project is a large-scale outdoor exhibit that brings brain health, art and imagination to the streets of Toronto. In 2016, The Brain Project launched its inaugural exhibit across the city to start a public conversation about brain health and bring awareness to diseases like Alzheimer’s.

As The Brain Project returns for its second year, one hundred artists from around the world will transform blank brain sculptures into beautiful, energetic and thought-provoking pieces of art. The sculptures are sponsored by corporations and philanthropists, and will be displayed in more than 15 locations around Toronto and the GTA.

Funds raised through the project are donated to Baycrest Health Sciences, a global leader in brain health and aging.

Nathan Phillip Square, Summer 2017

Yorkdale Shopping Centre, Fall 2017

MY BRAIN WAS PURCHASED BY TELUS HEALTH,

THE 2017 TITLE SPONSOR

2016 - CBC Arts 

Toronto

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HEARTBREAK TO ART

Depression made her see the world differently...so she picked up a camera

Photography gave this Toronto artist a new 'perspective' on life

 

CBC Arts · July 27

In this episode of Heartbreak to Art, we meet Toronto photographer Lindsi Beth Hollend as she takes on a photo walk through Allan Gardens. "It's a hidden gem," the artist says of the space — a lush greenhouse in the middle of downtown. Before she was a photographer, Hollend actually worked nearby — and really, photography is a very recent career for the mother of two. She bought her first camera in 2015, and as she reveals in the video, her new life as an artist began when she was diagnosed with depression and PTSD.

© 2019  Lindsi Beth Perspectives ~ good vibes only ~  forgive ~ love ~ be kind ~ 

SHIFT YOUR PERSPECTIVE